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Thread: analysing frequency's

  1. #1
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    analysing frequency's

    Does any one do this?

    For instance on a bass line that isn't coming through as well as it could. (sounds great on headphones but not audible in my car)

    Do you anaylize the frequency's? Or just change the sound?
    anyone use a spectrum analyzer?

    Your thoughts

  2. #2
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    hey blackwax,
    have you considered room acoustics? also there was this great little chart I had lying around which went through the entire audible spectrum and kind of pointed out what frequencies are great for what in relation to dance music, il try and dig it up for you its a really handy referance and I was stunned with how well it could tighten up a mix just by following some pretty basic EQ rules...

  3. #3
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    Thanks Jah that would be cool on the chart

    yes i have considered acoustics my room is far from ideal and my monitors are poor especially for bass reference

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackwax View Post
    Does any one do this?

    For instance on a bass line that isn't coming through as well as it could. (sounds great on headphones but not audible in my car)

    Do you anaylize the frequency's? Or just change the sound?
    anyone use a spectrum analyzer?

    Your thoughts
    hi blackwax here's something that may help you
    with regards to bass freq

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    Traxsource.com
    http://www.traxsource.com/

  5. #5
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    If you are mixing in your headphones(hope they are decent headphones) I suggest you use a freq analyser.
    But actually the best thing you can do is make your room comfortable for mixing/producing. It sounds better! It's just more fun, you become more creative! And always take a break after an hour or so cause your ears need that and you'll get better perspective about the track.
    A year ago I posted a link where you can add your room measurements and it calculated the flaws in your room. I'm speaking about your standing waves.
    Gonna have to look for it, if I find it I'll post it.
    Here are a few other tips...
    If in a square room, do not place your speakers in the corner.(It adds more bass than there actually is)
    Use a specific stand for it cause when you put them on a table, you again are adding more bass than there actually is.
    Create a sweet spot.

    Add two diffusers or a glass frame with a picture of you in L & R next to you where you sit.
    Use some absorbers in the back and corners. A curtain will do, or you can buy some cheap basstraps .
    you hear a whole different world
    If you are a bit serious about producing/mixing, take my advice.
    I look for the other link (standing waves)
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  6. #6
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    I bumped it.
    Look for the 'interesting audio links' thread
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traxsource FL View Post
    hi blackwax here's something that may help you
    with regards to bass freq

    Thanks!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by djfunq View Post
    If you are mixing in your headphones(hope they are decent headphones) I suggest you use a freq analyser.
    But actually the best thing you can do is make your room comfortable for mixing/producing. It sounds better! It's just more fun, you become more creative! And always take a break after an hour or so cause your ears need that and you'll get better perspective about the track.
    A year ago I posted a link where you can add your room measurements and it calculated the flaws in your room. I'm speaking about your standing waves.
    Gonna have to look for it, if I find it I'll post it.
    Here are a few other tips...
    If in a square room, do not place your speakers in the corner.(It adds more bass than there actually is)
    Use a specific stand for it cause when you put them on a table, you again are adding more bass than there actually is.
    Create a sweet spot.

    Add two diffusers or a glass frame with a picture of you in L & R next to you where you sit.
    Use some absorbers in the back and corners. A curtain will do, or you can buy some cheap basstraps .
    you hear a whole different world
    If you are a bit serious about producing/mixing, take my advice.
    I look for the other link (standing waves)
    some good advice there some i know some i didnt

    i dont like wearing headphones for too long and am well aware of ear fatigue/damage

    My room is not likely to change in the near future unless i rip at all out and start again
    its on the cards but not right now

    keep your thoughts coming folks this is what this forum should be about!!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traxsource FL View Post
    hi blackwax here's something that may help you
    with regards to bass freq

    The truth in a picture :-)

    I use Ozone sometimes to see the problem frequencies. There are a couple free analyzer plug-ins. Check here: http://www.kvraudio.com/
    http://www.kvraudio.com/forum/archiv...02-10/9898.php

    peace
    b
    Last edited by djbuzzard; 03-19-2009 at 07:14 PM.

  10. #10
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    yes, i do use a spectrum analyzer. sometimes for just one channel, sometimes on the master. Actually ,more than just sometimes.

    I'll go back and forth between different channels and the master to get a visual feeling/confirm what I hear about mix balance, sounds occupying the same frequencies, just how low a bass is playing, etc, etc.

    For example, a tight parametric cut can help a sound sit with another. Sure, you can and should hear this, too, but an analyzer helps you learn what to listen for and keeps you from just blindly reaching for knobs.

    I use abletons internal plug-in the most, simply becaue it sits nicely in the screen real estate.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by dag View Post
    yes, i do use a spectrum analyzer. sometimes for just one channel, sometimes on the master. Actually ,more than just sometimes.

    I'll go back and forth between different channels and the master to get a visual feeling/confirm what I hear about mix balance, sounds occupying the same frequencies, just how low a bass is playing, etc, etc.

    For example, a tight parametric cut can help a sound sit with another. Sure, you can and should hear this, too, but an analyzer helps you learn what to listen for and keeps you from just blindly reaching for knobs.

    I use abletons internal plug-in the most, simply becaue it sits nicely in the screen real estate.
    Hey here... the engineer
    Do you know about FFT (Fast Fourier)
    I use that with/in wavelab.
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