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Thread: Blame it on the Youth - dude said 2Pac was better that Rakin & Lil Wayne is the truth

  1. #1
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    Blame it on the Youth - dude said 2Pac was better that Rakin & Lil Wayne is the truth

    I told him, in all of your wisdom as an 8 year old whe 2Pac died...how can you say he was better than Rakim?

    His answer...."Noboby did it like Pac and kept it Gangsta"

    WOW..........

    They then got into a freestyle rap thing and I bet each one of em a dub that they could not flow without using profanity OR the word Nigga in a straight up rhyme for 90 seconds.

    They all failed.

    I then said, Rakim could rap a whole concert and not curse or say nigga. Lil Wayne's lyrics are hooks themself in a lot of cases.

    BUT..............ah, he just old.

    Ah..........good music don't go bad over time.

    I had to leave em with this...

    Al Capone, Gangster...

    John Gotti, Gangster...

    Nicky Barns, Gangster....

    Real Gangsters wear suits!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by LEONARD REMIX RROY View Post
    Real Gangsters wear suits!
    Very true..

  3. #3
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    Blame it on the Youth - dude said 2Pac was better that Rakin & Lil Wayne is the trut

    Remix, You should have asked those young cats about Big L, My man/LOL, Remix, In regards to your comment, 'Real gangsta's wear suits', Well, AZ from uptown/Harlem, Was just as true to the game of movin weight in New York, As Nicky Barnes, My man/LOL,

    Infact, AZ caught 9 in the body and 2 in the head, For his contributions, In regards to movin mad weight uptown/Harlem, During the 80's, Remix, AZ founded the hiphop crew, 'Mobstyle', Who recorded a few plates, During the eary to mid 90's('Gangsta

    Shit', 'The Good, The Bad, And, The Ugly'), Remix, AZ's life was depicted in the movie, 'Paid in Full', During the early 2000's, Along with AZ having mad static with NWA(Well, Really Easy/LOL), In regards to Easy poppin shit about living the life, When, It was clearly seen,

    That NOBODY FROM NWA WAS LIVING THE LIFE THAT THEY WAS RHYMING ABOUT ON WAX/LOL, Remix, AZ lived it to the utmost, My man, AZ was a millionaire, By the time he was 17 years of age, During the mid 80's, Though, AZ was never the type of cat to sport the latest wears/LOL, AZ would walk around mad grimy, With, 20G's in his pockets(Cats accepted AZ like that, My man/LOL), So, Remix, True gangsta's, Sometimes wear grimy shit and timbs, Too, My man/LOL.

    Much Respect
    Mike Barnes

  4. #4
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    Big L was crazy nice. Gone way too soon.

    The Holy Grail of The MC- Everyone comes after them
    Rakim
    KRS
    Kane
    Chuck D
    Melle Mel
    Kool Moe Dee
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  5. #5
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    Blame it on the Youth - dude said 2Pac was better that Rakin & Lil Wayne is the trut

    Remix, Here's some more information on AZ's former crew, 'Mobstyle', My man.

    Much Respect
    Mike Barnes




    Mobstyle:
    http://spizzyblog.com/2009/11/09/gan...ory-mob-style/

    Those who have seen the movie Paid In Full and study street-lore know the true story of Azie Faison, Rich Porter and Alpo Martinez. In the late 80’s, the three cohorts were raking in the dough as Harlem’s most notorious drug kingpins. Their once-powerful empire splintered when Azie was shot seven times in a botched robbery attempt and Alpo was jailed after murdering Porter, a man he once considered a friend.

    Azie survived the hail of gunfire and disavowed his life of crime. In 1989, a year before Richard Porter was killed, Azie formed a rap group called MobStyle with his associates Gangster Lou, Pretty Tone Capone and Whip Wop. The word “gangsta” is some made-up,

    Superficial Hip-Hop shit. The members of MobStyle, However, were bona-fide gangsters with heavy street reputations. Check out the cult-classic 1995 HBO documentary Lock Up: The Prisoners of Riker’s Island and you’ll find an unscripted moment with Gangster Lou chillin’ in a holding pen, shouting out MobStyle. In the streets of Harlem, Pretty Tone Capone had even the hardest niggas shook… and with good reason. He was known as a wild muthafucka; this was reflected in the maniacal way he shouted ad-libs and spit rhymes.


    Although they were too underground and too damn real to receive their props, they’re basically the first East Coast gangster rap group. Their debut album was named The Good, The Bad, The Ugly and it was released by an indie label called Grove Street Records. MobStyle were very vocal in their dislike for N.W.A., who were extremely popular nation-wide at the time. MobStyle considered them phony long before it was discovered that Ice Cube went to college for architecture and Dre wore make-up and sequins.

    Eazy-E threw a jab at MobStyle on N.W.A.’s joint, “Real Niggaz.” (“Back, the good the bad the ugly, see?/A lil’ streetwise nigga you know me/Rollin’ with some real niggaz playing for keeps/but you muthafuckas know who run the streets…”) After all, legend has it that Pretty Tone Capone set it on N.W.A. when they performed at The Apollo theater in Harlem. A tsunami of goons flooded the stage and the boys from Compton fled.

    Since Rich Porter was still alive and Alpo was a free man when The Good, The Bad, The Ugly was recorded, their names come up often on the album, in both shout-outs and lyrics. It’s obvious they all dealt with each other. These references hold a lot more weight than Rick Ross mentioning Manuel Noriega or other “gangsta” rappers who name-drop kingpins they’ve never met. MobStyle’s debut album is full of (pardon the pun) dope beats and hard-as-hell, realistic lyrics. Each member had a distinct style and Gangsta Lou, who had a tight flow, played MC Ren to Tone Capone’s Ice Cube (they’d hate that comparison, I’m sure).

    With his unruly bark, gold-toothed lisp and blackjack-to-the-skull rhymes, Pretty Tone Capone stood out on The Good, The Bad, The Ugly. Tone released an independent single called “Case Dismissed” which was a smash on the streets. In fact, he earned a solo deal from Rick Rubin’s Def American Records (re-named American Records), the same label that released the Geto Boys first major album. He dropped a hot single in 1992 called “Can’t Talk Too Long on the Telephone.” Perhaps because he kept one foot in the fast life and scared the hell out of industry folks, Tone’s rap career did not pan out how it should have. That’s a shame because Mr. Capone had skills and showed a lot of promise. On each record his already-wicked lyrics got progressively better.

    Harlem is my second home and back in the day I met Tone Capone on 127th Street & St. Nick through a mutual friend. After hearing so much crazy shit about him, it was a pleasant surprise when Tone shook my hand and was genuinely humbled that I loved his music. We chopped it up for quite a bit on that corner and he was a really cool dude, at least outwardly. The gooned-out hood legends that I’ve met in-person are some of the most reserved and polite folks ever. Guess that’s because they have nothing to prove.



    MobStyle would go on to release two more albums without Pretty Tone Capone. Azie dropped a solo album full of cautionary tales as well. But The Good, The Bad, The Ugly will always remain one of the best and most slept upon Rap LPs of all-time.

    Below, you will find a few songs from MobStyle’s debut album, as well as Pretty Tone’s “Case Dismissed.” “Big Nigga” captures a mood and was recorded for iced-out hustlers cruising the hood in their BMWs. Also included is Azie’s anti-crack song, “The Pipe.” Keep in mind that the album is rare and these joints were recorded from vinyl, so they sound a bit dusty. If anyone can get me another copy of The God, The Bad, The Ugly let me know. I lost mine and I’ll pay top dollar for it.

    In honor of MobStyle, I will now pop a bottle of old-school Moët White Star and salute their Great Moment in both Hip-Hop and Gangster History.

    Links of interest:

    MOBSTYLE “NOW & THEN” DVD

    AZIE FAISON WIKIPEDIA

    RICH PORTER WIKIPEDIA

    AZIE & ALPO MARTINEZ INTERVIEW FROM F.E.D.S. MAGAZINE

  6. #6
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    Blame it on the Youth - dude said 2Pac was better that Rakin & Lil Wayne is the trut

    Brooklyn, Yes, Big L was vastly talented, My man, Brooklyn i would have loved to see, What type of impact Big L would have had on the hiphop circuit, In regards to rhyming skills and talent, If Big L was with us today(Maybe, Big L could have changed the game, In

    Regards to lyrical ability, Like, Rakim did in 1986 and Mel did in 1977, My man, Brooklyn, I like your list of Holy-Grail of MC's, My man, Though, I would replace Chuck with Caz(Cold-crush 4), And, G.Rap/LOL.

    Much Respect
    Mike Barnes

  7. #7
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    I can add them no doubt but I can't take Chuck off. "I don't rhyme for the sake of riddling" that says it all. His rhymes were a lyrical assault with nothing but knowledge, not just clever stuff that sounded the alike.

    Honestly I think LL belongs on there too.

    I wanted to see Moe Dee's book to see how he listed them.
    The BK Show - Hosted by DJ Val Thursday's 8 PM www.DHPradio.com

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  8. #8
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    this is a bit off-topic, but I gave up arguing about music ( ESPECIALLY Hip-Hop) with younger listeners a LOOOOOOOOONG time ago.

    Why?

    Because it's all subjective. When we heard cats like Kane, Rakim, Chuck D, etc, it was in a different time. They were revolutionaries ( artisitically speaking), and most comparisons are unfair anyway. It's like comparing Usher to Marvin Gaye. Without Marvin there'd BE no Usher.

    Don't get me wrong, modern Hip-Hop doesn't inspire me much, but there's still cats like Talib Kweli, MF Doom, Phonte and BLU gettin' it done. I just ignore the wack shit.

    Most "fans" in 2010 base most of their argument on silliness like sales numbers, exposure level, and "swag" ( yet another reason I hate that word...). They can't debate on artistic merit. So arguing with them is a Fool's Errand.

    somebody wiser than me once said, "Never argue with a fool in public, someone watching might notbe able to tell the difference" ( or something like that...)

    So yep. They think L'il Wayne is God's gift to Hip-Hop. I'm not gonna argue. I just keep my opinion to myself and remember how my mind was blown the first time i ever heard "Rebel Without a Pause".

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